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Playing Favourites: CBC Radio 1

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Maybe it’s because I grew up listening to the CBC news at 6:00 every day. Maybe it’s because I have an insatiable curiosity to know what I might be missing in the world. Maybe it’s because I secretly wish to be a national radio news announcer.

Whatever the reason, CBC Radio 1 (2 and 3 are mostly music stations) is my radio station of choice. You can guarantee that, if I’m alone in my car and not listening to an audiobook on my iPhone (through my Bluetooth device) or some new music playlist, CBC is on.

I can get through a day or days without listening, so I know I’m not addicted, but you will rarely catch me listening to any other station. Perhaps I would if I could find a music station that wasn’t annoying or insidious or formulaic. (Yes, I know there are local stations that employ people I know… but really? Do you enjoy them?!)

In my opinion, the best programs are Q, As It Happens, and The Age of Persuasion. But there are lots of other interesting and informative programs that will fill the air waves in your car or home with (in my opinion) higher quality stuff than you can get at the local level or on your average rock station.

If music is what you love, CBC’s Radio 2 and Radio 3 have got you covered. You won’t be stuck listening to “easy listening” or “light rock” tunes ever again!

I know the CBC is not a perfect company (does such a thing even exist?), and they have their issues, but as a public broadcaster, they’re not sponsored by advertisers, so they don’t have to sell their soul to corporations. And your listening experience doesn’t get interrupted by commercials.

Plus, I always feel smarter after listening to a CBC Radio program. I get more interested in relevant issues. I understand more of what it means to be a Canadian.

When something that you enjoy keeps you connected and teaches you things, it’s worthy of “favourite” status. Just sayin’.

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Barbara Frum, a witty wordsmith. Who knew?

Barbara Frum

For a research paper on the CBC radio show As It Happens, I’m skimming former (now late) host Barbara Frum‘s book As It Happened, and I’m falling in love with her tongue-in-cheek snark:

“Thank goodness for sociology–it fills in so many of the blanks. It tells you that people in elevators get squirmy if you stare at them, that ugly people make more grateful marriage partners, that short people aren’t as tall as tall people, that Italians and Jews are inclined to holler when they’re in pain, and that people read in the bathroom to kid themselves about what they’re doing there. Were tax dollars not paying for it, I don’t think I’d mind so much. If sociologists find it stimulating to observe the obvious and the useless, who am I to quibble?”